Saturday, November 27, 2010

How Did I Make This Picture in 1975?

Hi All

I took this picture, my first ever published, in 1975.

Technically speaking, how did I make the picture? The camera is not in the straight-on reflection.

The photograph, a self-portrait, is a direct print from a negative.

Explore the light,
Rick

P.S. I added this P.S. after a few comments.

I took this picture while I was struggling as a music teacher.

I sent it to Technical Photograph magazine, where it got published.

Shortly thereafter, the publisher asked me to be the editor of a sister magazine, Studio Photography magazine.

After two years as editor, Minolta wanted me to head up the PR account Bozell and Jacobs... a position I held as V.P./Group Supervisor for 10 years.

I left the agency in 1990 to do what I am doing now.

Go figure....

Here is the answer: I used the tilts and swings of my dad's Linhoff 4x5 inch view camera to see the toaster head-on from an angle.

Good fun!

Now it's your turn! Take a self portrait this weekend!

19 comments:

victor said...

Toaster.

Carlos said...

it is a reflection from a toaster, is it?

Anthony - Motojournalism said...

Tilt-shift or perspective correction lens? the camera might have been just far enough to be out of "sight" of the toaster, with a PC lens to bring the lines straight.

My first thought was the camera was hidden over your shoulder in that dark area but the perspective ain't right for that...

Magnificent mustachio BTW!

W. Kirk Crawford said...

First it is not a mirror image.
It looks like you took a picture of the toaster and then applied the self-portrait via Photoshop.

W. Kirk Crawford
Tularosa, New Mexico

Anonymous said...

you used a mirror. The image we see is actually a reflection in a mirror and that is what you photographed?

mouring said...

I have to assume it was done the same way I did a 1980s slide shot for multimedia production I was working on.

In my case the camera itself was a step off to the right and two steps back from the model. Which is enough to keep the perspective nearly straight on while keeping the camera out of the reflection of the mirror.

Daniel Fealko said...

I'm going to take a guess, based upon the shape of the spoon and its reflection, that you had the camera off to your right side when this was taken. Using a perspective correction camera, the image was made to appear as taken straight on.

Thomas said...

Looks like the camera was on the same table as the mirror. The mirror was angled up to reflect your image while standing in front of the table. The mirror was not perfectly flat so it distorted your reflection

Edward Allen said...

Option 1: Tripod?
Option 2: Mind control?

(Nice 'tache Rick, it's not too late to grow another!)

Jim Dicecco said...

"If you can see the camera then the camera can see you" Place the camera off center and you stand off center. Look into the mirror. If you can see the camera and not yourself then it can see you but not itself. So you use a timer or remote switch. When the pictures is taken at an angle the mirror reflects you and not the camera. Of course, this is an old trick of wedding photographers and photo journalists.

Mark Williamson said...

The camera is moved just to the right so that it is out of the mirror. You can see that the spoon isn't in line with the reflection.

Troy Breidenbach said...

camera is in your left hand just out of the frame of the toaster...

jayson said...

I wanna say a Mirror and a cable release

Sentow said...

Based on the spoon's reflection, I'd say the camera was on the tabletop, to your right. (Boy, I remember when I had hair and it was dark too.)

Rick Sammon said...

W.Kirk.. no Photoshop... before Photoshop! :-)

Rick Sammon said...

Troy.. but the toaster is shot straight on! :-)

Rick Sammon said...

Andy and Daniel... Congrats!!

I used the tilts and swings of my dad's Linhoff 4x5 inch view camera to see the toaster head on from an angle.

Good fun!

Now it's your turn! Take a self portrait this weekend!

Explore the light - Rick

Barry said...

Last year I photographed a carnival midway ride (Wild Thang) that had the riders seated on a tilting spinning ring facing inward. The center post was square and reflective so that, if I timed my shots right, I got distorted reflected portraits of the riders faces as they zoomed by. Great fun.

Bob Abela said...

Perhaps you used a long lens?