Thursday, October 14, 2010

Quick Digital Imaging Tip 13/101: Include a Person In the Scene


Update 11/12/10: I originally posted this post from Laos. See the last three images. Then read this, which was in the NY Times yesterday.

This is #13 of 101 digital imaging tips I plan to post here over the next few months. Stay tuned.

No matter how small, a person can add interest to a scene – as illustrated by this photograph that I took this morning in Laos.

Bonus tip: You snooze, you lose! Get up early to capture the beauty dawn light.

On another note, what do the three snapshots (taken in a very remote village in Laos) below have in common? Let me know here on the blog, which is easier for me to track than facebook and twitter. Try to be as detailed as possible with your answer. I will respond when a reader gets it right.

Peace, love and joy,
Rick




17 comments:

BeachsidePaul said...

Well Rick, my eyes aren't what they used to be but it *looks* like they each have some pieces of old weaponry (possibly bomb casings) as a part of their structure. Just old eyes talking probably :-)

Anonymous said...

Loss of detail in the shadows.

Anonymous said...

The 3 images were taken in bright mid-day sun with a small aperture creating a deep depth of field with normal to wide-angle lens.

Barry D Kirsch said...

Looks like they all have things made of old bombs or military parts of some kind in them.

Kevin said...

They all have leading lines that draw the viewers eye into the picture.

Dienzo Designs said...

They've got picket fences there too!

Matt G. said...

Interesting use of triangles as a compositional device.

Anvilcloud said...

To me, there is no focal point of interest in any of them. Is that it?

Razz said...

Hey Rick,

It's changing the point if view for the subject (the building). Looking at a scene from different views.

Razz

Steven said...

They all seem to have repeating patterns of geometric shapes: fence, steps, railings.

"Chicago Dave" said...

Well, was going to say that they were all taken at (or close to) noon. But they also all have some sort of wooden picket fence in them, as well as a large green mountain in the background.... Not to mention the same photographer! :-)

Lemme take another look. MIGHT have the right answer in a minute.

John F. Peterson said...

It looks like there are bomb shells or casings as part of the structure in each of the photos.

John

Syd said...

Triangle shaped roofs.

yockoe said...

To busy by including too much (eye not drawn to a central point).

Larry Loar said...

Hi rick! I'm going to guess that besides seeing the old military artifacts, possibly courtesy of the US Army, I'm seeing that it looks like they are used for a more peaceful means now. It looks like they are used to collect rain water for use in the buildings. That's my story and I'm sticking to it. Thanks! Larry

Rick Sammon said...

Hi All

Thank you all for participating.

Bombs is the answer. Our guide told us that during the Vietnam war, when the American planes could not find their targets (bad weather, etc.) the pilots were instructed to drop the bombs in remote areas.

Not so remote, I guess. Made me kinda sad.

Traveling is a good education....

Rick

Ikijibiki said...

They're the homes of three people who have never been in my kitchen.